Currently browsing tag

class

dangerousclass_cover_marx72

The Dangerous Class and Revolutionary Theory: Thoughts on the Making of the Lumpen/Proletariat

by J. Sakai
paperback

308 pages
ISBN: 978-1-894946-90-2

J. Sakai’s ground-breaking, The “Dangerous Class” and Revolutionary Theory: Thoughts on the Making of the Lumpen/Proletariat, is our first major exploration of this most controversial and least understood “non-class” in revolutionary politics. It is an attempt to unknot the puzzle.  It encompasses the threads of criminality as well as gender, of breaking social boundaries and eating the bitterest of class politics.

At all times, the author interrogates the forming of left theory on this “dangerous class” by the highway flare  of his own experiences, and more importantly the mass violent liberation ...........READ MORE

Beyond Austerity – an article from Solidarity Across Borders (Montreal)

Austerity is often described as an act of class war, on the part of the rich. Depending on who is talking, this assault might be described as an attack against the middle class or the working class, or any number of constituencies in capitalism’s gunsights. It affects many people; consequently specific examples can galvanize broad opposition, mass mobilizations, and … easy recuperations. Because while neoliberal austerity hits many people, it does not hit us in the same way, nor with the same force.

Austerity appears to some as a theft, robbing them of the standard of living that they and ...........READ MORE

large_1092_wrbc_3

When Race Burns Class: Settlers Revisited (An Interview with J. Sakai)

EC: Settlers: Mythology of the White Proletariat is a book which had a major impact on many North American anti-imperialists. How did this book come about, and what was so new about its way of looking at things?

JS: Settlers  completely came about by accident, not design. And what was so “new” about it was that it wasn’t “inspiring” propaganda, but took up the experience of colonial workers to question how class really worked. It wasn’t about race, but about class. Although people still have a hard time getting used to that – it isn’t race or sex that’s the ...........READ MORE