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Invisible No More: Police Violence Against Black Women and Women of Color

A timely examination of the ways Black women, Indigenous women, and other women of color are uniquely affected by racial profiling, police brutality, and immigration enforcement.

Invisible No More is a timely examination of how Black women, Indigenous women, and women of color experience racial profiling, police brutality, and immigration enforcement. Placing stories of individual women—such as Sandra Bland, Rekia Boyd, Dajerria Becton, Monica Jones, and Mya Hall—in the broader context of the twin epidemics of police violence and mass incarceration, it documents the evolution of movements centering women’s experiences of policing and demands a radical rethinking of our visions ...........READ MORE

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2017 Slingshot Organizers at Kersplebedeb Leftwingbooks.NET

By far the most popular way for anarchists to stay organized, the Slingshot 2017 organizers are here, complete with mini-calendar, daybook planner, address book section, international radical contact list, and nifty what happened on this day notes scattered throughout. The artwork, as ever, is wonderful in a chaotic punk rock way.

Now in its 23rd year of publication, Slingshot is a 176 page planner/agenda with radical dates for every day of the year, space to write your phone numbers, a contact list of radical groups around the globe, menstrual calendar, info on police repression, extra note pages, plus much more. ...........READ MORE

Towards a Radical Critique of Eurocentrism: An Interview with Alexander Anievas and Kerem Nisancioglu (repost)

According to the dominant narrative, the origin of capitalism was a European process at its core: this was a system born in the mills and factories of England, or under the blades of the guillotines during the French Revolution.

Read the rest of this post on the original site at Towards a Radical Critique of Eurocentrism: An Interview with Alexander Anievas and Kerem Nisancioglu ...........READ MORE

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Learning from an Unimportant Minority:Race Politics Beyond the White/Black Paradigm

Race is all around us, as one of the main structures of capitalist society. Yet, how we talk about it and even how we think about it is tightly policed. Everything about race is artificially distorted as a white/Black paradigm. Instead, we need to understand the imposed racial reality from many different angles of radical vision. In this talk given at the 2014 Montreal Anarchist Bookfair, J. Sakai shares experiences from his own life as a revolutionary in the united states, exploring what it means to belong to an “unimportant minority.”

 

Quoting from the book:

Race is notoriously slippery, ...........READ MORE

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Fire the Cops! by Kristian Williams

Killer cops and cop-killers, “police as workers” and police as soldiers, copwatching and counterinsurgency operations… these subjects and more are examined in this collection of essays by veteran activist Kristian Williams, released to mark ten years since the first publication of his book Our Enemies in Blue in 2004.

In section one, focusing in on police murders in Portland, Seattle, and Oakland, Fire the Cops! examines the relationship between working-class communities (predominantly Black) and the police, showing how police violence and impunity function to buttress the power of the State, and arguing that the left should recognize the political content ...........READ MORE

Valerie Solanas:

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Author: Breanne Fahs Format: Paperback Size: 352 pages ISBN: 9781558618480 Publisher: The Feminist Press at the CUNY Year: 2014 Price: $22.95 (USD) List price: $22.95 (USD) Quantity *

Too drastic, too crazy, too “out there,” too early, too late, too damaged, too much—Valerie Solanas has been dismissed but never forgotten. She has become, unwittingly, a figurehead for women’s unexpressed rage, and stands at the center of many worlds. She inhabited Andy Warhol’s Factory scene, circulated among feminists and the countercultural underground, charged men money for conversation, despised “daddy’s girls,” and outlined a vision for radical gender dystopia.

Known for ...........READ MORE